Montessori Methods

The Montessori Method was discovered by Dr. Maria Montessori in the year 1890. From the first Montessori school for little children that has been founded in the year 1907, where as of today, around the world have 22,000 Montessori schools.

Montessori is a method of education that is based on self-directed activity, hands-on learning and collaborative play. In Montessori classrooms children make creative choices in their learning, while the classroom and the highly trained teacher offer age-appropriate activities to guide the process. Children work in groups and individually to discover and explore knowledge of the world and to develop their maximum potential.

Montessori classrooms are beautifully crafted environments designed to meet the needs of children in a specific age range. Dr. Maria Montessori discovered that experiential learning in this type of classroom led to a deeper understanding of language, mathematics, science, music, social interactions and much more. Most Montessori classrooms are secular in nature, although the Montessori educational method can be integrated successfully into a faith-based program.

Every material in a Montessori classroom supports an aspect of child development, creating a match between the child’s natural interests and the available activities. All items in the environment are scaled to the child’s size, including furniture, shelves, utensils, dishware, cleaning implements and the Montessori materials themselves. There is no focal center to the classroom; this reflects that the teacher is not the focus of the children’s attention, but that they are all one community together. Bright and attractive colors, natural materials, fascinating cultural objects and interesting pictures on the wall all offer the children complex sensory and intellectual experiences.Children can learn through their own experience and at their own pace. They can respond at any moment to the natural curiosities that exist in all humans and build a solid foundation for life-long learning.

MONTESSORI METHOD TRADITIONAL METHODS
Based on helping the natural development of the human being Based on the transfer of a national curriculum
Children learn at their own pace and follow their own individual interest Children learn from a set curriculum according to a time frame that is the same for everyone
Children teach themselves using materials specially prepared for the purpose Children are taught by the teacher
Child is an active participant in learning Child is a passive participant in learning
Understanding comes through the child’s own experiences via the materials and the promotion of children’s ability to find things out for themselves Learning is based on subjects and is limited to what is given
Learning is based on the fact that physical exploration and cognition are linked Children sit at desks and learn from a whiteboard and worksheets
Child can work where he/she is comfortable, move around and talk at will while not disturbing others Child is usually assigned own chair and encouraged to sit still and listen during group sessions
The teacher works in collaboration with the children The class is teacher led
The child’s individual development brings its own reward and therefore motivation Motivation is achieved by a system of reward and punishment
Environment and method encourage internal self-discipline Teacher acts as primary enforcer of external discipline
Child works as long as he/she wishes on chosen project Child generally given specific time limit for work
Uninterrupted work cycles Block time, period lessons
Mixed age groups Same age groups
Working and learning matched to the social development of the child Working and learning without emphasis on the social development of the child
Shared emphasis on intellectual, social, emotional and spiritual development Main emphasis on intellectual development
Shared focus on the acquisition of academic, social, practical and life skills Main focus on academics

 

 

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